American Politics, Identity and Baybayin

I don’t usually go to political events but I went to a rally for Fil-ams to confirm if my idea to use baybayin as a cultural identifier for businesses would also be applicable to politicians. After having pancit, fried chicken and a Carona, I spoke to some people in the audience, community organizers and a couple politicians. These politicians obviously want the support of the Filipino American community and specifically new young voters. The problem is how to identify as a Filipino without alienating others. It’s not a good idea I guess politically to say “Ryan Santos: Filipino” on a sign. People vote for people that they fell can trust to address their issues. Someone that speaks their language, literally and figuratively.

Below is the website of David Chiu. He uses a writing system specifically to identify him as Chinese and at the same time communicate to his target market.

In contrast, here’s the website below for Rob Bonta who’s Filipino.  The problem with Filipinos is that we are chameleons. We can look like virtually any race. Our last names can mistake us for Latin, Chinese, “American” or a handfull of others.

Fil-Am candidates should use Baybayin on their marketing materials to identify as Filipino. It does not have to communicate like David Chiu does because the reality is that the majority of Filipinos cannot read Baybayin (yet). However, the segment that Fil-Am politicians want to reach (young), do recognize it. Who will be the 1st Fil-Am politician to utilize Baybayin? Contact me and I’ll help you out.

2 thoughts on “American Politics, Identity and Baybayin

  1. I don’t think Filipinos can look like any race. That’s a wrong and ignorant assumption in my opinion. The vast majority of Filipinos look like their typical South East Asian neighbors. I never saw a Filipino that looked White or Black unless they happened to be mixed. Most of the time, Filipino either look southeast Asian or some other Asian nationality.

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