GMA's Philippine Treasures

GMA should win a cultural award for their promotion of Baybayin this year. This past Sunday Sept 11, GMA aired they much hyped Philippine Treasures special. In one of the segments, they featured…..you guessed it! The rock you love to hate, The Ticao Stone, AKA Rizal Stone, AKA the rock that may have buried Lapu Lapu (yes, that’s a real quote), AKA the Dremel Stone and AKA (insert your own).

Why was there so much emphasis on the Ticao Stone when it hasn’t even been proven an artifact? I get why but it’s an insult to the Golden Tara.

Besides the unproven Ticao artifact, they briefly showed the Laguna Copper Plate, Calatagan Pot and various Hanunóo and Tagbanwa scripts.

Overall it was pretty good and worth watching.

My favorite part was seeing the ex-long “distance speculator”, Christopher Miller checking out the rock.

Watch the Baybayin segment while you can

9 thoughts on “GMA's Philippine Treasures

  1. Haha! *Now* I see what that guy with the huge shoulder videocam was there for. I noticed him hovering around all over the place, filming different things. 

    The footage brings me back to the conference again. (Just arrived for the end of the first day, drenched in seawater and still drying off…) So funny watching the kids reciting the letters from the blackboard in school! This is *exactly* what they were doing after the conference when I was trying to work on my computer: they all swarmed around me (the one foreigner in the place) to see what I was doing and I ended up showing them pictures on my drive of Baybayin from different archival documents. I pointed to each name and letter and read them out, and the kids recited the letters and names after me, just like in school! 

    I do notice that the main interest (like among so many people) seems to be in Baybayin *so long as it is an inscription on an [apparently ancient] artifact*). The *huge* body of writing by everyday people on documents from the Spanish era just seems to go nearly totally ignored — even though the largest store of this writing is sitting right there in the University of Santo Tomas in Manila. Yet there is so much more we can learn from this writing than from any other source. In fact, we can’t understand or evaluate many of these artifacts properly without understanding how people actually wrote Baybayin and how different ways of writing each letter related to each other. The handwriting (together with careful anthropological data coming from some keen observers) is the key to understanding how everything else fits in the picture. (Or not in the picture at all, in the case of the Calatagan Pot Inscription…)

    By the way, did I hear them referring to the Laguna Copperplate Inscription as “Baybayin”? My Tagalog isn’t progressing fast enough for me to be sure exactly what they were saying…

    • Yep, quite right Chris. They are ignoring the massive and concise cataloging of the cumulative works of the Spaniards, Dutch, Italians, and Filipinos from the 16th century up to the present.

      I scoffed at the comment that the Spaniards “burned” artifacts containing Baybayin and “forced” us to use the Roman Alphabet when there are historical records & proof that contradicts that. If the friars & scholars did not record and wrote volumes of books with information about Baybayin, none of these so-called experts in the Philippines would have known about it… not that they know much of anything about it now from what it seems. …hmmmm, maybe these “experts” can’t read those old Spanish, Dutch, or Italian books?

      And again, that ugly misnomer “Alibata” came up as what they think is legitimized by scholars when “Baybayin” is the term most legitimate scholars used in the old publications.

      I also can’t help but yell, “OH COME ON! IT’S OLD JAVANESE! KAWI! KAVI! IDIOTS! GAAHH!” when they said that the Laguna Copperplate Inscriptions (LCI) was “Baybayin”.

    • Yep, quite right Chris. They are ignoring the massive and concise cataloging of the cumulative works of the Spaniards, Dutch, Italians, and Filipinos from the 16th century up to the present.

      I scoffed at the comment that the Spaniards “burned” artifacts containing Baybayin and “forced” us to use the Roman Alphabet when there are historical records & proof that contradicts that. If the friars & scholars did not record and wrote volumes of books with information about Baybayin, none of these so-called experts in the Philippines would have known about it… not that they know much of anything about it now from what it seems. …hmmmm, maybe these “experts” can’t read those old Spanish, Dutch, or Italian books?

      And again, that ugly misnomer “Alibata” came up as what they think is legitimized by scholars when “Baybayin” is the term most legitimate scholars used in the old publications.

      I also can’t help but yell, “OH COME ON! IT’S OLD JAVANESE! KAWI! KAVI! IDIOTS! GAAHH!” when they said that the Laguna Copperplate Inscriptions (LCI) was “Baybayin”.

  2. i really love the program aired last sept.11, 2011…. about our own treasures (Philippine Treasure) when i was in school one of my biggest dream was an archeologist. hope GMA 7 will feature more regarding our cultural heritage…. 

  3. i really love the program aired last sept.11, 2011…. about our own treasures (Philippine Treasure) when i was in school one of my biggest dream was an archeologist. hope GMA 7 will feature more regarding our cultural heritage…. 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s